Brent

TID built 1945 by Pickersgill, William & Sons, Southwick, Sunderland

Designated ensign Designated house flag

3

Registered


Service Vessel

Tug


TID

Maldon


Private use

Private Use


No

No


19/02/2010

01/11/2016



Gallery


Propulsion

Steam

Steam compound


1946

Scotch Return Tube


J G Kincaid & Co, Greenock

1946


Dimensions

To be confirmed

16.98 feet (5.18 metres)


73.61 feet (22.45 metres)

7.93 feet (2.42 metres)


54.00


History

Built in 1945 by William Pickersgill, Sunderland for the Ministry of War Transport and designated TID 159, BRENT was one of 182 TID class tugs built between 1943 and 1946.  These steam tugs were one of the first UK ventures into all welded prefabricated steel shipbuilding. Most were used by the Admiralty.  TID 159 was one of the last to be built and did not see war service. 

She was sold to the Port of London Authority at a subsidised price to replace wartime losses and renamed BRENT. Working in the Dredging Department and Dock System of the PLA she was eventually laid up in 1969 and sold to a shipbreaker in 1970. 

BRENT was saved for preservation by Ron and Janet Hall in 1971. She was successfully used as a floating home and tug yacht, with minimal alteration to her original fabric, but some changes made to allow for living on board.  The engine room and machinery are still entirely as original. For some 25 years she sailed round Thames and East Coast waters and twice went as far as the Netherlands. Due to concerns about her boiler, she was laid up in 1994. In 2002 her bottom was over plated to prevent water ingress and part of the hull was re-plated. She was moved to her current berth at Cook’s Yard, Maldon, by the promenade path.

A trust was set up for her preservation and in 2011 she was placed under the ownership of the Steam Tug Brent Trust. For maintenance and restoration, a small team of volunteers work on board regularly. The Trustees are seeking funding for major repairs, to enable her to steam again.

Ron L Hall, Ships Monthly (January Still in Steam, 1977) Still in Steam: Steam Tug Brent
Norman J Brouwer, International Register of Historic Ships (Edition 2, 1993, pp137-8) pub: Anthony Nelson
Steamboat Register: An illustrated Register of surviving steam vessels in the British Isles (May Edition 6, 1994) pub: Steam Boat Association of Great Britain
Ron L Hall, Ships Monthly (May, 1972, pp182-3) I fell in love with a steam tug
M J Gaston, Warship World (Spring, 1986, pp20-21) TIDs were a Temporary Measure
Ron L Hall, Steam Tug 'Brent' - leaflet pub: Hall, Ron L

Previous names

  1. 1945 – 1946TID 159

Key dates

  1. 1945 Built for the MoWT as TID 159
  2. 2011 The vessel is now owned by the Steam Tug Brent Trust and is no longer in private owsnership Source: current owners
  3. 1946 Acquired and fitted out by the PLA, renamed "Brent" 
  4. 1970 Sold to Stour Salvage for breaking 
  5. 1971 Bought by Ron and Janet Hall for preservation
  6. 2011 Acquired by Steam Tug Brent Trust 

Bibliography

    Built in 1945 by William Pickersgill, Sunderland for the Ministry of War Transport and designated TID 159, BRENT was one of 182 TID class tugs built between 1943 and 1946.  These steam tugs were one of the first UK ventures into all welded prefabricated steel shipbuilding. Most were used by the Admiralty.  TID 159 was one of the last to be built and did not see war service. 

    She was sold to the Port of London Authority at a subsidised price to replace wartime losses and renamed BRENT. Working in the Dredging Department and Dock System of the PLA she was eventually laid up in 1969 and sold to a shipbreaker in 1970. 

    BRENT was saved for preservation by Ron and Janet Hall in 1971. She was successfully used as a floating home and tug yacht, with minimal alteration to her original fabric, but some changes made to allow for living on board.  The engine room and machinery are still entirely as original. For some 25 years she sailed round Thames and East Coast waters and twice went as far as the Netherlands. Due to concerns about her boiler, she was laid up in 1994. In 2002 her bottom was over plated to prevent water ingress and part of the hull was re-plated. She was moved to her current berth at Cook’s Yard, Maldon, by the promenade path.

    A trust was set up for her preservation and in 2011 she was placed under the ownership of the Steam Tug Brent Trust. For maintenance and restoration, a small team of volunteers work on board regularly. The Trustees are seeking funding for major repairs, to enable her to steam again.

    Ron L Hall, Ships Monthly (January Still in Steam, 1977) Still in Steam: Steam Tug Brent
    Norman J Brouwer, International Register of Historic Ships (Edition 2, 1993, pp137-8) pub: Anthony Nelson
    Steamboat Register: An illustrated Register of surviving steam vessels in the British Isles (May Edition 6, 1994) pub: Steam Boat Association of Great Britain
    Ron L Hall, Ships Monthly (May, 1972, pp182-3) I fell in love with a steam tug
    M J Gaston, Warship World (Spring, 1986, pp20-21) TIDs were a Temporary Measure
    Ron L Hall, Steam Tug 'Brent' - leaflet pub: Hall, Ron L

If you are the owner of the vessel and would like to provide more details or updated information please contact info@nationalhistoricships.org.uk

hawse eye:

tubular metal fitting in the bows of a vessel through which the anchor cable passes