Replica Definitions

What is a replica?

A replica is a vessel which has been built from scratch as a copy of a vessel.

It should not be confused with a historic vessel undergoing major works which has been ‘reconstructed’ - returned to a known earlier state with the introduction of new material.  In some cases, a historic vessel may be subject to ‘extreme reconstruction’ where the majority of the original material is decayed or missing, resulting in a major rebuild using new materials. 

Different types of replication:

- True Replica

An exact and complete reproduction of the original vessel.

- Hull Replica

An exact replica of the hull of a vessel, but not the rig.

- Operational Replica

An accurate replica which has adaptations to meet modern-day health and safety, MCA and international regulations in order to allow the vessel to operate within carefully defined parameters.

- Hypothesis

A theoretical vessel based on archaeological, historical and technical information which can test theories but which cannot be guaranteed as a faithful recreation.

- Operational Hypothesis

A theoretical vessel based on archaeological, historical and technical information but with adaptations to meet modern-day health and safety, MCA and international regulations in order to allow the vessel to operate within carefully defined parameters.

- Representation

A vessel which draws on known features from the craft it has been designed to represent, but which may or may not take on the appearance of a specific vessel.  The emphasis is on overall impression rather than accuracy.

For more information on replica terminology or to see examples of the different types of replication, you can order a copy of the National Historic Ships’ guidance publication Conserving Historic Vessels.  When registering a vessel for inclusion on the UK Replica List, you will be asked to make an assessment as to which category of replication the vessel falls into, using the above headings.

               

landing strake:

the strake between the binding strake and the top strake