Alaska

Saloon Launch built 1883 by Horsham J S & W J, & Co, Bourne End

Ensign House flag

7

National Historic Fleet


Passenger Vessel

Launch


Saloon Launch

Marlow


Commercial Activity

Commercial trade


Yes

Yes


30/11/-0001

30/11/-0001


Web site

www.thames-steamers.co.uk

Gallery


Propulsion

Steam

Steam


Locomotive

H A McEwen (Boiler Repairs) Ltd, Keighley


1985


Dimensions

To be confirmed

9.84 feet (3.00 metres)


59.67 feet (18.20 metres)

3.21 feet (0.98 metres)


16.00


History

ALASKA was built in 1883 at Bourne End by J. S. & W. J.  Horsham and Co. as a hire boat to take parties on day trips from Bourne End Wharf.   She was subsequently purchased by Salter Brothers of Oxford in 1886.  In 1887 Salters used ALASKA to inaugurate their famous Oxford to Kingston service. This trip took 2 days going down to Kingston and 3 days for the return leg to Oxford.  Passengers stayed in boarding houses and hotels along the route and the fare for the trip, excluding accommodation, was one pound ten shillings (£1.50).  Up until WWII, ALASKA plied this route, gradually being relegated to shorter portions as more vessels were built to cope with demand.  She was also used for parties and private functions, much as she is today.

At the outbreak of war, the boat was sold to Jackson Brothers of Putney and served time as a guard boat but was then sold to Mears of Twickenham who used her for trips between Richmond and Teddington.  Apparently, the skipper during this period attempted to procure tips from the passengers by telling them that the boat had been to Dunkirk, which is completely untrue but probably had the desired effect!

With her engine removed at Kingston, ALASKA was then 'poled' with a punt pole all the way up-river to Oxford.  She was later sold to Putney Sea Scouts, who took out the steam plant and used her as their headquarters, but the enterprising Boy Scouts chopped up the wooden superstructure and sold it as fire wood in order to raise funds for a new hut.  Around 1948, she was sold as a hulk and was used as a hire boat pontoon at Medley Boat Station in Oxford.  When she was rediscovered there in 1974, she was sat on the bottom, decked over with plywood being used as a boarding pontoon for hire boats.

ALASKA was brought down river wrapped in plastic sheeting with an outboard motor attached and then spent 12 years in Peter Freebody's boatyard at Hurley, being restored to her former glory.  She was reunited with her original engine and fitted with a new boiler and finally relaunched in 1987.

Robin Gates, Classic Boat (August, 1992, pp12-17) Alaska to Windsor
Geoffrey Hamer, Trip Out 1995/6 - A Guide to the Passenger Boat Services of the British Isles (1995) pub: G P Hamer
Norman J Brouwer, International Register of Historic Ships (Edition 2, 1993) pub: Anthony Nelson
Steamboat Register: An illustrated Register of surviving steam vessels in the British Isles (May Edition 6, 1994) pub: Steam Boat Association of Great Britain
Kathy Mansfield, Classic Boat (September, 2015, pp16-17) Thames Traditional Boat Festival Back in Style
Classic Boat (June, 2012) 1,000 Boat Pageant - Steamers and Workboats

Key dates

  1. 1883 Built in Bourne End
  2. 1888-1942 Used as a Thames passenger steamer and for private parties
  3. 1942 Vessel decommissioned
  4. 1950 Used as a pontoon at Medley Boat Station, Oxford
  5. 1974-1986 Vessel fully restored
  6. 1986 Back in service as a Thames steamer
  7. 2012 Took part in the Diamond Jubilee pageant on the Thames

Bibliography

    ALASKA was built in 1883 at Bourne End by J. S. & W. J.  Horsham and Co. as a hire boat to take parties on day trips from Bourne End Wharf.   She was subsequently purchased by Salter Brothers of Oxford in 1886.  In 1887 Salters used ALASKA to inaugurate their famous Oxford to Kingston service. This trip took 2 days going down to Kingston and 3 days for the return leg to Oxford.  Passengers stayed in boarding houses and hotels along the route and the fare for the trip, excluding accommodation, was one pound ten shillings (£1.50).  Up until WWII, ALASKA plied this route, gradually being relegated to shorter portions as more vessels were built to cope with demand.  She was also used for parties and private functions, much as she is today.

    At the outbreak of war, the boat was sold to Jackson Brothers of Putney and served time as a guard boat but was then sold to Mears of Twickenham who used her for trips between Richmond and Teddington.  Apparently, the skipper during this period attempted to procure tips from the passengers by telling them that the boat had been to Dunkirk, which is completely untrue but probably had the desired effect!

    With her engine removed at Kingston, ALASKA was then 'poled' with a punt pole all the way up-river to Oxford.  She was later sold to Putney Sea Scouts, who took out the steam plant and used her as their headquarters, but the enterprising Boy Scouts chopped up the wooden superstructure and sold it as fire wood in order to raise funds for a new hut.  Around 1948, she was sold as a hulk and was used as a hire boat pontoon at Medley Boat Station in Oxford.  When she was rediscovered there in 1974, she was sat on the bottom, decked over with plywood being used as a boarding pontoon for hire boats.

    ALASKA was brought down river wrapped in plastic sheeting with an outboard motor attached and then spent 12 years in Peter Freebody's boatyard at Hurley, being restored to her former glory.  She was reunited with her original engine and fitted with a new boiler and finally relaunched in 1987.

    Robin Gates, Classic Boat (August, 1992, pp12-17) Alaska to Windsor
    Geoffrey Hamer, Trip Out 1995/6 - A Guide to the Passenger Boat Services of the British Isles (1995) pub: G P Hamer
    Norman J Brouwer, International Register of Historic Ships (Edition 2, 1993) pub: Anthony Nelson
    Steamboat Register: An illustrated Register of surviving steam vessels in the British Isles (May Edition 6, 1994) pub: Steam Boat Association of Great Britain
    Kathy Mansfield, Classic Boat (September, 2015, pp16-17) Thames Traditional Boat Festival Back in Style
    Classic Boat (June, 2012) 1,000 Boat Pageant - Steamers and Workboats

If you are the owner of the vessel and would like to provide more details or updated information please contact info@nationalhistoricships.org.uk

copper fastened:

a vessel whose plank fastenings are of copper rather than iron