Previous names

  • 1943 - 1945 HDML 1387
  • 1945 - 1949 FDB 76
  • 1949 - 1961 SDML 3516
  • 1961 - 1968 HMS Medusa (A353)
  • 1968 Medusa
Certificate no 522
Status National Historic Fleet
a12admin

Details

Function Fighting Vessel
Subfunction Harbour Defence Launch
Location Gosport
Vessel type Harbour Defence Motor Launch
Current use Private use
Available to hire Yes
Available for excursions No
Info required No
Web address http://www.hmsmedusa.org.uk/

Construction

Builder Newman, R A & Sons Ltd, Poole
Built in 1943
Hull material Wood
Rig None
Number of decks 2
Number of masts 1
Propulsion Motor
Number of engines 1
Primary engine type Diesel
Boiler type None
Boilermaker None

Dimensions

Breadth: Beam
16.66 feet (5.08 m)
Depth
4.92 feet (1.50 m)
Length: Overall
72.06 feet (22.00 m)
Tonnage: Gross
56.00
Air Draft
To be confirmed

History

Significance

MEDUSA is the last HDML in original seagoing condition. She had a distinguished record in World War II and is the last surviving vessel to have been at Omaha beach on D Day. Visitors are able to experience at first hand what life was like on board a small vessel travelling to D Day and her speed, grace and power evoke strong memories, particularly for those who served in the Coastal Defence Force.

The Medusa Trust maintains an extensive archive of documents, photographs and records of all 480 HDMLs and their crews. It is to the great credit of all the owners and volunteers involved over the years that MEDUSA has survived for so long. 2008 saw her undergoing a major refit to ensure that she will remain fully seaworthy and to extend her life; this will enable her to travel further at home and abroad in order to tell her important story to a wider audience.

HMS MEDUSA was launched as Harbour Defence Motor Launch (HMDL) 1387 in 1943. In May 1944 she took part in the practise assault carried out by American forces at Slapton Sands, Devon and served at D Day as a Navigation Leader marking the approach channels through minefields at Omaha Beach.  Later in the war she patrolled off Scheveningen, Holland and then on to Ijmuiden which was still occupied by Germans who surrendered to her.

As the war ended she took a party of senior officers up the North Sea Canal to Amsterdam as part of the surrender process and was the first allied vessel to enter the city.   After the war she was refitted at William Osborne’s Yard, Littlehampton, Sussex and redesignated as Fast Despatch Boat (FDB) 76.  She became a training ship at Cardiff University Naval Division in 1946, transferred to Severn Division RNVR Unit in 1947, and moved to London Division RNVR Unit in 1949 and redesignated as Seaward Defence Motor Launch (SDML) 3516. 

In 1952 she became a hydrographic survey vessel and in 1961 was named HMS MEDUSA and given the pennant number A353.  She was paid off for disposal at Devonport in 1965 but her last day in service was marred by a fire in the forward accommodation which caused considerable damage.  Sold by the RN in 1968, she was then moved to Portland and used as a private motor yacht for 4 years making 36 crossings of the English Channel.

A major restoration started in 1972 involving extensive repairs to the hull and rebuilding the superstructure.  She made a number of trips in the late 1970s/early 1980s and, in 1985, she was handed over to Gosport Borough Council to become part of the ill fated Coastal Forces Museum and moved to Portsmouth where she was to have various moorings round the harbour.   MEDUSA was present at the D Day 50th anniversary celebrations and visited both Omaha and Juno beaches.   In 1997 she became training tender to the Southampton Unit of the Maritime Volunteer Service and in 2005 participated in the Fleet Review to mark the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar.  She became the responsibility of the Medusa Trust.

In 2005 the Trust was awarded almost £1m by the Heritage Lottery Fund to fund a major refit to extend her operational life by 60 years.  In 2008, she was part way through this refit and ashore at Hythe, Southampton Water being worked on by the Maritime Workshop as well as volunteers from the Medusa Support Group.  Source; David Newberry, Advisory Committee, December 2008.

Sources

World Ship Society British Armed Forces Small Craft Historical Society, Survivors Register, 1998
Boyce, Mike, HDML 1387 Medusa, 5th Edition, The Medusa Trust, 1993
Classic Boat: HMS Medusa restored and refloated, May 2010
Classic Boat: RKJ awards restoration of HMS Medusa, August 2012
Classic Boat: London - RKJ awards restoration of HMS Medusa, August 2012
Fricker, David, Warship World: Medusa - the last HDML, pp22, Spring 1986 

Key dates

  • 1943

    Vessel launched as HMDL 1387

  • 1944

    Took part in practice assault undertaken by American forces at Slapton Sands, Devon

  • 1944

    Served at D-Day as a Navigation Leader marking the approach channels through minefields at Omaha Beach

  • 1945/6

    Refitted at William Osborne’s Yard, Littlehampton, Sussex and re-designated as Fast Despatch Boat (FDB) 76

  • 1946

    Became a training ship at Cardiff University Naval Division

  • 1947

    Transferred to Severn Division RNVR Unit

  • 1949

    Moved to London Division RNVR Unit and redesignated as Seaward Defence Motor Launch (SDML) 3516

  • 1952

    Operated as a hydrographic survey vessel

  • 1961

    Re-named HMS MEDUSA

  • 1965

    Paid off for disposal at Devonport, but her last day in service was marred by a fire in the forward accommodation, causing considerable damage

  • 1968

    Sold by the Royal Navy and moved to Portland for use as a private motor yacht

  • 1972

    Underwent major restoration involving extensive repairs to the hull and rebuilding the superstructure

  • 1985

    Handed over to Gosport Borough Council for the Coastal Forces Museum and moved to Portsmouth

  • 1994

    Present at the D Day 50th anniversary celebrations, visiting both Omaha and Juno beaches

  • 1997

    Became training tender to the Southampton Unit of the Maritime Volunteer Service

  • 2005

    Participated in the Fleet Review to mark the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar

  • 2005

    The Medusa Trust awarded almost £1 million by the Heritage Lottery Fund to fund a major refit to extend her operational life by 60 years

  • 2008

    Undergoing refit ashore at Hythe, Southampton Water being worked on by the Maritime Workshop and volunteers from the Medusa Support Group

  • 2010

    October: rededication ceremony, attended by The Princess Royal, to recognise the completion of the vessel’s refit

  • 2011

    April: back at sea with the Royal Navy taking part in a fleet exercise with the 1st Patrol Boat squadron comprising ten Archer Class P2000 patrol boats

  • 2012

    Vessel selected for  Queen's Diamond Jubilee Pageant on 3 June 2012

  • May 2015

    Awarded National Historic Ships'  Regional Flagship Winner.

Grants

  • May 2015

    A Project grant of £250 for being  one of our Regional Flagship Winner 2015 was made from the Strategic Development Fund of National Historic Ship Uk

  • 2012

    Was one of three winners of a £3,000 Haven Academy Award on 26 June, at a ceremony in London. The money enabled the boat's five-year restoration project to be complete in time for this year's Thames Pageant. 

  • 2009

    A grant was awarded to the Trust for £20,00 by the PRISM Fund

  • 2004-2005

    The Heritage Lottery Fund awarded £1,228,000 for completion of the restoration project

  • 2003-2004

    The Heritage Lottery Fund awarded £32,500 for a conditin survey

Own this vessel?

If you are the owner of this vessel and would like to provide more details or updated information, please contact info@nationalhistoricships.org.uk

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